AESTHETICS
  • THE LANGUAGE OF THE NEW BRUTALITY (NINA POWER)
  • We need to think much more carefully about the word-images that surround us, to make distinctions between the way violence is described and presented, and not think that all images are equally interchangeable. We need to remember all the words and ways of speaking we have forgotten, and note the way in which certain words, such as “cuck,” come to dominate our ways of speaking and thinking.
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  • WILL THE MILLENNIAL AESTHETIC EVER END?
  • Investigating the undying tyranny of terrazzo. The millennial aesthetic promises a kind of teleology of taste: as if we have only now, finally, thanks to innovation and refinement, arrived at the objectively correct way for things to look. If you simultaneously can’t afford any frills and can’t afford any failure, you end up with millennial design: crowd-pleasing, risk-averse, calling just enough attention to itself to make it clear that you tried.
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  • THE TWENTY-FIRST-CENTURY “LEISURE” CLASS
  • How did such a prosaic choice of action, so subtle and ostensibly innocuous, become an amplified sign of class? Throughout time, mat- ters of seeming practicality have evolved into symbols of status. In Vic- torian England, the displaying of medicines in the parlor was a sign that one could afford to see a doctor and buy medicine. In pre-Revolutionary Paris, the use of candles was rare and expensive, yet even when access to light (and later electricity) became more democratized, the lighting of candles at dinnertime remained a sign of taste and breeding.3 The same is true for the use of cloth napkins when paper napkins would do (and eliminate the hassle of laundering).
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LLIST 2020